Six-legged superfood: Is this the future?

Entomophagy is as old as humankind. Globally, 2 billion people regularly and intentionally consume insects. The rest of us do so unknowingly: from ketchup to chocolate and from pasta to peanut butter, creepy crawlies sneak into virtually all processed foods. Don’t be alarmed! Insects offer various nutritional benefits: they are rich in protein, fat, fibre, vitamins and minerals.

Over 500 species of edible insects have been recorded in Africa but most are seasonal and harvesting them from the wild may not always be sustainable. Insect farming on the other hand offers a low-cost, year-round, resource-efficient supply of food which could help to eradicate hunger and malnutrition.

In the framework of the Flying Food Project (www.flyingfoodproject.com) dozens of Ugandan women have been trained to farm crickets. We paid them a visit to learn how this agricultural innovation promises to boost household incomes, improve family health, support gender equality and safeguard the environment. Lip-smacking goodness.

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